Category: Miscellaneous

Roger Moore and the Crimefighters 2: “Crook Ahoy” (Danish first edition 1978)

NOVEL

 

Roger Moore og Krimipatruljen 2: Spioner til søs (1978)

David Fleming (= Fielden Hughes)

Danish first edition
Original:
Roger Moore and the Crimefighters – Crook Ahoy (Everest Books 1977)
Publisher:
Grafisk Forlag
Publishing date:
1978
Translator:
Vivi Berendt
Cover artist:
Ernst Køhler
Layout:
Birgit Lerstrup
Format:
120 pages, hardcover
Also published as a seven-part serial in the weekly comic magazine Tempo no. 1/1979 to 7/1979 (Gutenberghus)

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Sir Roger Moore (1927-2017): Rest in peace.

OBITUARY

Sir Roger Moore (1927-2017). Publicity photo

James Bond 007 can never die.

And that makes Sir Roger Moore's passing feel all the more unreal. The iconic English actor died peacefully in his home in Switzerland, as reported by Variety on May 23, 2017.

I had the good fortune of catching Sir Roger Moore On Tour at London's Royal Festival Hall on November 27, 2016. This would turn out to be the legendary Sir Roger's very last public performance. His knees wobbled, and his voice cracked, but Moore's recall and the ironic twinkle were undiminished, as was his taste for telling bawdy jokes which cheerfully contrasted with his noble appearance. The highlight of the show: The classic line "My name is Bond, James Bond" spoken by James Bond himself.

Fun fact: During the show Roger Moore spoke of his wife, Kristina "Kiki" Tholstrup, as being Swedish – and not Danish, as the Danish gossip rags would have it.

A million thanks for 007, "The Saint", "The Persuaders!" and for being the very best Roger Moore in the world. Rest in peace, Sir Rog.

“Thunderball”: Politiken’s film review (1965)

Danish daily Politiken’s review of ”Thunderball”, 18th December 1965

The stolen nuclear bombs

World premiere of the latest James Bond film

"James Bond needs no introduction; after all, he's the hero of our times for better or worse. But as we're now treated to a world premiere of his new film, ”Thunderball”, it must be said that his latest adventure is very much of a technological bent. Sure, there are lovely girls aplenty, and this particular year, the beautiful coupling of technology and erotica is something that we should know everything about, but the girls are of a rather synthetic quality; they hardly arouse any interest among Bond or the audience, and this year, we can't be ignorant of the fact that technology and irony ought to be merged, but in a showdown between technology, wit, and romance, technology (in this film) takes the lead.

This makes sense in our cold, technological spy era. Yes, it's inhuman, and therefore not really thrilling, but seeing this much technology – that actually works! – is amusing nonetheless. In his previous film, Bond had a car that could do just about everything; now he's equipped with advanced frogman gear that would make any mermaid smack her tail with envy.

This time, he battles the international crime syndicate Spectre, who has kidnapped two nuclear bombs and is demanding a ransom of several millions. Bond is not only given a car that any one of us would find useful while driving under the influence; he also gets a radioactive pill which, when swallowed, states your position; a wristwatch of wonders, clever weaponry, and a good deal of equipment for going under water. The latter turns out to be a good idea, inasmuch as the gangsters have hidden the bombs at the bottom of the sea, and the majority of the film places us among sharks and other minnows. The engineers behind this endeavor might have become so pleased and impressed with their undersea prowess that they've overdone it a bit; the film feels longish and somewhat monotonous in spite of all its ingenuity, but even so, seeing all this technology in action beneath the waves, where frogmen shoot each other down with arrows during the climax, is diverting. Could this be the first undersea fight in history?

The plot as such should be experienced rather than retold. It has a few charming implausibilities of its own and a steadily increasing tension. Once more, Sean Connery plays James Bond with a relaxed, off-hand charm, indifferent as well as efficient; villains, women, and sharks make up the supporting cast. The film is not top-drawer Bond, but otherwise it's self-recommendatory. Its success is guaranteed and bound to be huge."

Review written by Bent Mohn
Translation by James Bond•O•Rama.dk

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Bond•O•Rama meets George Lazenby, pt. 2: “James Bond in Oslo” (2016)

PHOTO REPORT

Last night, 1 September 2016, George Lazenby – the 76-year-old former ex-James Bond from Australia – visited Oslo, the capital of Norway. James Bond•O•Rama.dk reports from the event.

James Bond in Oslo banner

The event "James Bond in Oslo" featured a gala showing of George Lazenby's only James Bond film, "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" (1969), digitally restored in 4K.

Before the gala screening at Vika Kino, George Lazenby participated in an onstage Q&A moderated by former Bond girl Maryam d'Abo (Kara Milovy in "The Living Daylights", 1987).

Maryam d'Abo og George Lazenby i Vika Kino, Oslo 01.09.2016 - © Brian Iskov
Maryam d'Abo and George Lazenby at Vika Kino, Oslo 01.09.2016 - © Brian Iskov

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