“Dr. No”: Danish theatrical poster (1963)

FILM POSTER

 
On 5 April 1963, United Artists released EON Productions' "Dr. No" theatrically in Denmark. The film's Danish title reads "Agent 007 mission: drab" [Agent 007 Mission: Kill].

The theatrical poster pictured below, measuring 83x62 cm, was produced for the first Danish cinema release of "Dr. No.". The poster was clearly inspired by the UK campaign, with the addition of a striking yellow-black-white color scheme. The uncredited artist who traced Mitchell Hooks' artwork of the four Bond girls from the UK poster might have been an employee at United Artists' distribution office in Denmark.

Ian Fleming 's name is Danicized to Jan Fleming on the poster, concordant with the first Danish editions of his James Bond 007 novels. The director's name, Terence Young, and EON Productions are both misspelled.

“From Russia With Love”: Aktuelt’s film review (1963)

Film review, 21 December 1963

 
Several Danish film critics expressed their dislike of the James Bond 007 films during their original release in the early 1960's. The highly regarded Bjørn Rasmussen, M.A., who reviewed films for the Danish daily Aktuelt and hosted the film programme "Filmorientering" on national Danish television during the 60's, dismissed the Bond films as "sensationalist entertainment marked by poor taste" in his reference book "Filmens Hvem-Hvad-Hvor" (1967). He did however note that "From Russia with Love" (1963) was "the best in the series".

When EON Productions' "From Russia with Love"  was released into Danish theatres in December 1963, Bjørn Rasmussen was markedly less kind in his scathing review for Aktuelt:

”Agent 007” returns

Christmas programming at Nørreport Cinema is brutal entertainment

With the pulp thriller ”From Russia with Love” (1963), Nørreport [Cinema] picks up from ”Dr. No”. This is a coarsely brutal, sensational serial based on Ian Fleming's vulgar novels, issued in Denmark by [Sven] Hazel's publishing house (of all!). The films, as well as the novels, are brimming with straightforward suspense, devoid of probability and based on the spectator not having time to detect the obvious gaffes.

This time, a so-called ”Lektor” is to be smuggled out and change hands from Russian to English ownership. We are not dealing with a lecturer [”lektor” in Danish, ed.] but a decoding machine. Fights, murders, sex, and speed is mobilized as well as all kinds of spies for all kinds of nations. They are secretly spying on each other nonstop. The most repulsive of them all would be Lotte Lenja [sic], the widow of Kurt Weill, evil incarnate and an efficient member of the international crime organization ”Spectre” who are also out to get the Lektor.

In the middle of all this nonsense, a glimmer of something truly cinematic shines through as is often the case with rudimentary pulp thrillers such as this. But [the film] is dreadfully simple and unpleasant to watch.

Written by Bjørn Rasmussen
Translation by Bond•O•Rama.dk

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Roger Moore and the Crimefighters 1: “The Siege” (Danish first edition 1978)

NOVEL

 

Roger Moore og Krimipatruljen 1: Gidseldrama i London (1978)

David Fleming (= Malcolm Hulke)

Danish first edition
Original:
Roger Moore and the Crimefighters – The Siege (Everest Books 1977)
Publisher:
Grafisk Forlag
Release date:
1978
Translator:
Vivi Berendt
Cover artist:
Ernst Køhler
Layout:
Birgit Lerstrup
Format:
128 pages, hardcover
Also published as an eight-part serial in the weekly comic magazine Tempo no. 46/1978 to 1/1979 (Gutenberghus)

At the peak of Roger Moore's succes as James Bond 007 around the time of "The Spy Who Loved Me" in 1977, the actor lent his name and visage to a literary spin-off which has since been all but forgotten.

”Roger Moore and the Crimefighters" (Danish: "Roger Moore og Krimipatruljen”) was a series of young adult crime novels originally published in the United Kingdom by Alpine/Everest Books in 1977. Five of the six installments were released in Danish translations by publishing house Grafisk Forlag from 1978 to 1980. Although each book had a different author, all the Danish editions are credited to "David Fleming":

● 1. Gidseldrama i London [Hostage Crisis in London] (The Siege, 1978)
● 2. Spioner til søs [Spies at Sea] (Crook Ahoy, 1978)
● 3. Jagten på narkohajerne [The Hunt for the Drug Lords] (The Anchor Trick, 1979)
● 4. A/S Butikstyveri [Shoplifting Inc.] (One Thousand and One Shoplifters, 1980)
● 5. Døden går i cowboybukser [Death wears Denims] (Death in Denims, 1980)

Stickers producered by Grafisk Forlag, Denmark 1978

The obvious precedent was "The Three Investigators" (1964-83, Danish title: ”Alfred Hitchcock og de tre detektiver”), a popular series of American crime novels for children. In each book the iconic British thriller director Alfred Hitchcock made a short cameo appearence as a sort of mentor to the young leading characters.

This same gimmick was re-used in ”Roger Moore and the Crimefighters" which does not actually star Sir Roger but follows three nosy London kids who invariably end up thwarting some sort of crime. Roger Moore appears fleetingly in the first book, "The Siege" (Danish: "Gidseldrama i London”), on page 107 (out of 128) and again in the epilogue.

BBC has invited the meddling kids – Bonnie, Bill, and Darren – into the studio after they have involuntarily helped the police unravel a hostage situation on an African embassy in London. As luck would have it, the famous Roger Moore (described as a tall and "very handsome" man) is working at the BBC that day and takes the time to express his admiration for the children's crimefighting achievement:

"So I've got an idea to form a club called the Crimefighters for kids like you. Do you mind if I pull up a chair and tell you about it?"
- Roger Moore as Roger Moore in "The Siege"

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Sir Roger Moore (1927-2017): Rest in peace.

OBITUARY

Sir Roger Moore (1927-2017). Publicity photo

James Bond 007 can never die.

And that makes Sir Roger Moore's passing feel all the more unreal. The iconic English actor died peacefully in his home in Switzerland, as reported by Variety on May 23, 2017.

I had the good fortune of catching Sir Roger Moore On Tour at London's Royal Festival Hall on November 27, 2016. This would turn out to be the legendary Sir Roger's very last public performance. His knees wobbled, and his voice cracked, but Moore's recall and the ironic twinkle were undiminished, as was his taste for telling bawdy jokes which cheerfully contrasted with his noble appearance. The highlight of the show: The classic line "My name is Bond, James Bond" spoken by James Bond himself.

Fun fact: During the show Roger Moore spoke of his wife, Kristina "Kiki" Tholstrup, as being Swedish – and not Danish, as the Danish gossip rags would have it.

A million thanks for 007, "The Saint", "The Persuaders!" and for being the very best Roger Moore in the world. Rest in peace, Sir Rog.