Tag: interview

OHMSS 50: Exclusive John Glen interview (2019)

During this summer's unofficial OHMSS 50 celebration for "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" at Piz Gloria, James Bond•O•Rama.dk had the pleasure of meeting long-time EON associate John Glen.

The 87-year-old Englishman edited "On Her Majesty's Secret Service" and directed the second unit on location in Switzerland back in 1968-69. John Glen later performed the same duties on "The Spy Who Loved Me" (1977) and "Moonraker" (1979) before graduating to director on every EON-produced Bond film during the 80's: "For Your Eyes Only" (1981), "Octopussy" (1983), "A View to a Kill" (1985), "The Living Daylights" (1987) and "Licence to Kill" (1989).

In this exclusive chat with Bond•O•Rama.dk John Glen discusses some of his favourite Bond locations as well as the editing techniques of "OHMSS" and other tricks of the trade.

● "OHMSS 50": Pictures from Piz Gloria
● "OHMSS 50": Pictures from Mürren, Lauterbrunnen and Bern

John Glen being interviewed at Piz Gloria on June 1, 2019. Photo credit: Schilthorn Canbleway

John Glen, what would you name as your favourite Bond location?
I think Piz Gloria [would be at number one]. The Bernese Oberland is probably one of the best locations we've ever had. It's such a vast scene, it's very James Bond in its aspects. [The Bond connection] is the history of this place, isn't it.
I believe Piz Gloria and Schilthornbahn is the only Bond film location ever to write in their contract that they had unlimited means of promoting it as an official Bond location. And apparently EON Productions are not very happy about that.
It's indirectly free publicity, it's still 007, isn't it. And that's the important thing. It's an amazing franchise. Everyone says, how long can it go on for. I remember Lewis Gilbert saying to me that he thought it would probably come to an end after "Moonraker", "maybe that's the end of the series". It cost a lot of money, "Moonraker". Subsequently, of course, all of these new markest have opened up.

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James Bond concert in Tivoli: Interview with Adrian Prabava (2017)

EVENT

On Friday 07.07.2017, Tivoli Copenhagen Phil performs "The Hunt for 007 - an Evening with James Bond" at Tivoli Concert Hall in Copenhagen. James Bond•O•Rama.dk attended the first rehearsal and interviewed the conductor, Adrian Prabava.

The iconic date 07.07.2017 has inevitably given rise to several James Bond 007-themed events in Copenhagen. On this very Friday, Tivoli Concert Hall presents "The Hunt for 007 - an Evening with James Bond" as part of Tivoli's annual music festival SommerKlassisk.

Indonesian-born German conductor Adrian Prabava will be conducting the Tivoli Copenhagen Phil (formerly known as Tivolis Symfoniorkester) in a full programme of music from the James Bond 007 films. The programme was provided by European FilmPhilharmonic Institute.

At the initial rehearsal that James Bond•O•Rama.dk was invited to on Tuesday 4th July, The Tivoli Ensemble and vocalist Pernille Rosendahl were not yet in attendance. The Tivoli Ensemble will support the orchestra with drums and electric instruments at the concert; they might also fill in the iconic guitar riff (if Prabava so chooses) during the "James Bond Theme". Rosendahl, who is slated to sing four songs, has previous Bond experience from her band Swan Lee whose single "Tomorrow Never Dies" in 1997 was a contender for the title theme in the eponymous film.

During rehearsal, the conductor and the orchestra go through the entire programme for the first time. Prabava halts the music several times in order to fine-tune specific note lengths and polish any rough corners. Part of Michael Kamen's "Licence to Kill" score is repeated for string section only and then with strings and woodwinds until Prabava is satisfied with the result. It is like hearing the familiar 007 soundtracks being remixed and deconstructed live.

The percussionist gets a proper workout during Thomas Newman's busy action cues from "Skyfall". Afterwards, Adrian Prabava describes this suite as the "most challenging" part of the programme. The orchestral sound will be overdubbed with live synthesized effects and timed exactly to the sound effects in the accompanying scenes from the film which will be shown on a screen behind the musicians. Furthermore, modern composing for films is generally more complex than in the 60s, says Adrian Prabava.

"You can tell that film music has developed a lot the last ten years. Orchestral writing for cinema is getting more specialized, with greater possibilities of sampling and using the orchestra. There is kind of a new genre of composing for film, and this is also an aesthetic you can hear in "Skyfall"."

The disparity between Thomas Newman's hectic contemporary score and the luxurious, pop- and jazz-inflected John Barry sound from the sixties is particularly apparent when performed in direct sequence. Adrian Prabava senses that the melodic style of film composing might be coming back, though:

"Nowadays, if I listen to contemporary pop music, many pieces don't have this depth of composition we used to have in pop music in the 60s. I'm talking about harmony, about rhythm. Very often is it reduced to a simple rhythm and bass, with a lot of repetition, less melody. This is the music of our time. So this is reflected in the movie compositions as well. Many people go home without being able to sing along to what they heard in the cinema, it's very rare now. I think there is a turning back, with musical films like "La La Land", this longing for the ... emancipation of melody, going back to the fullness, a full-bodied composition."

Dirigent Adrian Prabava - pr-foto © Ulrike von Loeper

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“The World is not Enough”: Danish TV interviews and review (DR2 1999)

In December 1999, the film programme "Bogart", broadcast on national Danish TV channel DR2, featured a lengthy segment on the newly released James Bond 007 film "The World is Not Enough" (Eon Productions 1999).

First, actor Ulrich Thomsen talks to journalist Søren Høy about his role as Davidov in the film. This part is in Danish.

Next, director Michael Apted and Pierce Brosnan (James Bond 007) discuss the film in junket interviews with Søren Høy. These interviews are in English with Danish subtitles.

The segment ends with a capsule review of "The World is not Enough" in Danish by the show's host, Ole Michelsen.

Watch more rare James Bond 007 videos on Bond•O•Rama's Vimeo page

“Casino Royale” (1967): Terence Cooper – the forgotten Agent 007 (1996)

In 1967 Columbia Pictures launched their farcical big-budget adaptation of Ian Fleming's "Casino Royale" with the tagline "Too much for one James Bond".

In the film, the original Sir James Bond (David Niven) has retired, leaving the field open to a number of impersonators who are all issued with the code name 007 by the British Secret Service, MI-6. Among the most prominent young 007's is the athletic ladies' man Cooper, played by Northern Irish actor Terence Cooper (1933-1997).

Almost 30 years after "Casino Royale", correspondent Karen Glahn from Danish daily Morgenavisen Jyllands-Postens tracked down Terence Cooper in Australia. Although the text states Cooper's age as 67, he would have been 62 at the time of the interview. The article was published in Morgenavisen Jyllands-Posten on 21 May 1996, a year before the actor's death in September 1997. The following English translation is a James Bond•O•Rama.dk exclusive:

Terence Cooper – the forgotten Agent 007

By Karen Glahn

James Bond is 67 years old and performs his most dangerous missions on a lady's bicycle.
He is Terence Cooper, who was James Bond in the mostly forgotten 1967 film ”Casino Royale”.
”I'm the James Bond that fell into oblivion. I'm not famous as Sean Connery, George Lazenby, Roger Moore or Timothy Dalton, but I am proud to be among the men who have portrayed Agent 007 through the years”, Terence Cooper says.
He is now a respected nature and bird painter in Northern Australia, and reconciling the large tan middle-aged man who wears a sarong around his ample girth to the physically fit womanizing 007 with a licence to kill requires quite a leap of the imagination.

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“GoldenEye”: Izabella Scorupco – Danish TV interview (“I biffen” 1996)

Prior to the Danish theatrical release of "GoldenEye" in January 1996, Polish-Swedish actress Izabella Scorupco (who played Natalya Simonova in the EON film) was interviewed by Bo Larsen for the syndicated film programme "I biffen".

In the interview, Izabella Scorupco gives her definition of a Bond girl for the 1990's. She talks about her childhood toys and dreams and the lack of gender equality in modern society (still a topical subject today!).

The interview was sourced and edited from a VHS recording off local station TV Fynboen. Except from a brief introduction in Swedish, the segment is in English with Danish subtitles.

More cool videos at James Bond•O•Rama's Vimeo page

“Licence to Kill”: Danish TV special featuring Timothy Dalton, John Glen et.al. (1989)

On July 6th 1989, the day before the Danish theatrical release of EON Productions' 16th Bond film "Licence to Kill", TV 2 Denmark broadcast this 15 minute special called "Mit navn er Bond ... James Bond" (My name is Bond ... James Bond).

In the special, TV 2's Jes Dorph-Petersen interviews actors Timothy Dalton (James Bond 007), Robert Davi (Franz Sanchez), Talisa Soto (Lupe Lamora) and Desmond Llewelyn ('Q') as well as the film's director, John Glen.

The interviews are in English with Danish subtitles. Apologies for the inferior video quality (the clip was sourced off a VHS recording).

Watch the TV 2 station IDs for "Mit navn er Bond ... James Bond" (1989)

More rare videos at James Bond•O•Rama's Vimeo page

Roger Moore in Copenhagen: Danish TV interview (TV 2 1995)

Today, 14 October 1927, marks Sir Roger Moore's 89th birthday.

In 1995, Roger Moore agreed to an interview for the children's show "Snurre Snups Søndagsklub" [Bugs Bunny's Sunday Club] on Danish TV 2 to mark UNICEF's international "Tune In To Kids Day".

The show's host, Bubber (Niels Christian Meyer), met Special UNICEF representative Roger Moore at Hotel D'Angleterre in Copenhagen. The interview was eventually broadcast as a show in its own right, titled "Roger - a gentleman", on 31.12.1995 (with a re-run on 1.1.1996).

In the show, Roger Moore talks about his many visits to the Danish capital of Copenhagen and his childhood in 1930's London. He also shares his thoughts on child rearing and the challenges of being a gentleman in our time and age.

The show is in English with Danish subtitles. Apologies for the poor image quality (the footage was sourced from a second-generation VHS recording).

More rare videos at James Bond•O•Rama's Vimeo page