Tag: GoldenEye

“GoldenEye”: Video report from the Danish gala premiere (TV 2 1996)

The 24 January 1996 edition of the youth programme SuperPuls on Danish network TV 2 covered the Danish gala premiere of "GoldenEye" which took place at Copenhagen's Imperial Cinema on January 11.

The video is mostly in Danish although host Tina Bilsbo is seen interviewing Pierce Brosnan (James Bond 007) on the red carpet. The clip also features interview snippets with Brosnan, composer Eric Serra and singer Tina Turner from the "GoldenEye" EPK (Electronic Press Kit). These are in English with Danish subtitles.

The clip is sourced from a VHS taping which explains the poor image quality.

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“GoldenEye”: Izabella Scorupco – Danish TV interview (“I biffen” 1996)

Prior to the Danish theatrical release of "GoldenEye" in January 1996, Polish-Swedish actress Izabella Scorupco (who played Natalya Simonova in the EON film) was interviewed by Bo Larsen for the syndicated film programme "I biffen".

In the interview, Izabella Scorupco gives her definition of a Bond girl for the 1990's. She talks about her childhood toys and dreams and the lack of gender equality in modern society (still a topical subject today!).

The interview was sourced and edited from a VHS recording off local station TV Fynboen. Except from a brief introduction in Swedish, the segment is in English with Danish subtitles.

More cool videos at James Bond•O•Rama's Vimeo page

“Bond in Motion”: Ben Collins interview (2014)

FEATURE

Ace stunt driver (and Matthew Perry look-alike) Ben Collins turns 41 today.

Ben Collins doubled Daniel Craig during the opening Aston Martin car chase in the James Bond film "Quantum of Solace" (EON Productions, 2008). He has also previously incarnated the mysterious The Stig on BBC's "Top Gear".

This exclusive interview with Ben Collins took place during the "Bond in Motion" press day at London Film Museum, 18 March 2014.

All text © Brian Iskov/James Bond•O•Rama. 

Ben Collins, any items you'd fancy from the "Bond in Motion" exhibition?
There's nothing much here you wouldn't want to take home. The jetpack [from ”Thunderball”, 1965] would be brilliant for commuting. There's a dodgy little Renault 11 that had its roof decapitated in "A View to a Kill" (1985). I like that because the car chase was so wild. If I could take one home, it would be the DB5, obviously, because it's such a timeless look.

Ben Collins in the Aston Martin DBS from "Quantum of Solace" (2008). Photo by London Film Museum
Ben Collins in the Aston Martin DBS from "Quantum of Solace" (2008). Photo by London Film Museum

You drove the Aston Martin DBS in the ”Quantum of Solace” (2008) opening car chase. What was it like for you as a race car driver to adapt to the stunt world?
My job is normally about protecting the car and not putting dents in it. In ”Quantum of Solace”, the door gets ripped off, and the car gets smashed to bits. We pretty much destroyed 12 brand-new Aston DBS cars which brings a tear to the eye. But it looked really cool, so who cares!

Sometimes what looks very simple might turn out to be quite complicated. We did one scene in Siena with the car driving through a tunnel, which didn't look very impressive, but the gap on either side of the wind mirrors was less than a centimeter on either side. Suddenly you realise you could look really stupid if you make a mistake.

Detail of Aston Martin DBS from "Quantum of Solace" (2008) . Photo by London Film Museum
Detail of Aston Martin DBS from "Quantum of Solace" (2008) . Photo by London Film Museum

Could you describe what it's actually like, driving an Aston Martin DB5? Because I know I'm never ever gonna get to drive one.
It's very smooth, because you've got lots off the suspension than what we get used to in cars these days. There's no ABS, no traction control - a lot of the bullshit, in a way, that we've been infected with with modern cars, doesn't exist on that car. Some people would be horrified to think that this car doesn't have all the electronic aids, and actually it's just very well-balanced, so in a lot of ways, the old style is much more effective than a modern car.

It's a little bit more complicated to drive, but ten times more rewarding than driving some modern box. And you feel everything in the road. When the car takes a corner, you feel it lean over, you can feel the tyres biting at the tarmac. No power steering. It's just got a lot more feedback, so you feel very connected. It's a super car to drive.

Aston Martin DB5 from "GoldenEye" (1995). Photo by London Film Museum
Aston Martin DB5 from "GoldenEye" (1995). Photo by London Film Museum

Some would say that Bond's DB5 outracing Xenia Onatopp's Ferrari in ”GoldenEye” isn't exactly a plausible scenario.
I guess they were playing with each other, weren't they. They were racing, but not trying to get away from each other. In a straight performance, probably not, and certainly I would say that an Aston DBS is quicker than an Alfa Romeo. But there were a lot of obstacles in Bond's way, and I guess that's what makes the chase exciting.

Thanks to London Film Museum and Ben Collins. Happy birthday, Ben!

“GoldenEye”: Pierce Brosnan interviewed on Danish TV (1996)

"Navnet er ... James Bond" (DR1 25.01.1996)

In this rarely seen TV special from 1996, journalist Elisabeth Wille meets a remarkably candid Pierce Brosnan at the Hotel d'Angleterre in Copenhagen during the actor's Danish press tour for "GoldenEye".

Pierce Brosnan is so unguarded in this lengthy chat that he even agrees to say the famous line on camera: "The name is Bond ... James Bond" (which is also the show's title in Danish).

The 14 ½ minute programme is in English with Danish subtitles. It was originally shown 25 January 1996 on DR1 (Danish national television). This version is a VHS rip.

● See more at James Bond•O•Rama's Vimeo page

“GoldenEye”: Potato chips from Estrella (1995)

MERCHANDISE


"You know the quality. You know the taste."

With this slightly awkward spin on the "GoldenEye" tagline, the company Estrella A/S launched these GOLDENEYE CHIPS on the Danish market in 1996: 

GoldenEye Chips Estrella 1996 (front)

The packaging proudly stated that these potato crisps were in fact "recommended by James Bond 007". A highly dubious claim, given the four flavour enhancers and artificial meat flavouring (!?) found among the ingredients.

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“Bond in Motion”: Chris Corbould interview (2014)

FEATURE

This interview with special effects supervisor and EON Productions veteran Chris Corbould took place during the "Bond in Motion" press day at London Film Museum, 19 March 2014.

All rights © Brian Iskov for James Bond•O•Rama.

Chris Corbould, your first Bond gig was as a special effects assistant on ”The Spy Who Loved Me” back in 1976. How many Bond films have worked on since then?
I've done 13 in all [14 including the later ”Spectre” - ed.]. The one film I didn't work on was ”Octopussy” (1983).

So you're definitely an integral part of the Bond family.
Yes. They [the Broccolis] are a great family to work with. I've had many great years working with them. Hopefully many more.

Chris Corbould with the Jaguar XKR from 'Die Another Day' (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for London Film Museum)
Chris Corbould with the Jaguar XKR from 'Die Another Day' (Photo by Chris Jackson/Getty Images for London Film Museum)

Do you ever get to drive any of the cars in the films?
Absolutely. These [Jaguars and Aston Martins from ”Die Another Day” (2002)] are quite interesting, because my department had to modify both cars. We actually had four Jaguars and four Astons to be four wheel-drived, because there were no four wheel-drive models of these cars. The whole chase sequence, the battle sequence, happened on the ice, so we decided to convert them to four wheel-drive. Plus all the weapons. We had a lot of fun on this sequence on the ice, and because we were on ice, both cars had an inflating ... buoyancy system. So if they went through the ice, they would automatically inflate and keep both the driver and the car afloat.

And you're triggering all effects live from this radio-control console?
Yes. That controls the missiles coming out, the gun rotating, the gun firing ... You know, the driver has enough to do doing all the stunt driving, so we figured we wouldn't give him that responsibility. So we would always handle all the gadgetry that went on.

The SFX remote control gadget box for Vanquish and Jaguar (Die Another Day, 2002)
The SFX remote control gadget box for Vanquish and Jaguar (Die Another Day, 2002)

I'm guessing you didn't do the invisible car. That would have been another department.
No, no, no, we left that to somebody else. I'm not a great fan of that one, but there you go! I think we pushed the limits a bit too far on that one.

So which of the Bond cars did you like the most?
I enjoyed the Vanquish, I thought it was a nice car. Actually liked the one in ”The Living Daylights” (1987), which was a real meaty ... the Vantage?

The [Aston Martin] Volante? The black one with the outrigger skis?
Yeah, that was my favorite, because I was prepping that, doing all the preparation in Austria when we shot it, so we would take it out on the ice and drive it around the ice. It was a lot of fun.

Aston Martin V8 Volante from "The Living Daylights" (1987). Photo by London Film Museum
Aston Martin V8 Volante from "The Living Daylights" (1987). Photo by London Film Museum

Did you work on the Lotus Esprit when you did ”The Spy Who Loved Me”?
Sadly, I didn't. I was on that film mainly based back in England, and they shot most of that in the Bahamas.

Is it true that you couldn't get the Aston Martin DBS in ”Casino Royale” (2006) to roll over because the tyre grip was too good?
It wasn't that. The centre of balance was so good that the stunt guys tried several times to steer into it and turn it, and in the end, we had to put a small nitrogen cannon in it. So as they turned into it, we would hit the nitrogen cannon, and it would make that flip. Once it was flipping, it was fine. It was just getting it flipping that was the problem, initially. But we got it in the end. They're just class cars, aren't they? They're not designed to flip over. They put a lot of work into them to make sure they don't flip over. We had to help it a little bit.

Apparently, around the time of ”GoldenEye” (1995), the British Automobile Association complained that Bond shouldn't be driving a BMW.
Well, so what really? You have to change every now and again, and when the Aston came back, everybody loved it again. You can't just stick with the same car every time. We had the Lotuses for a little while, we had the BMW's, and we're back to Astons now. It just makes it more fun, I think, if you change it a little bit every now and again. It would get boring if you just kept using the same car.

Aston Martin DB5 from "GoldenEye" (1995). Photo by London Film Museum
Aston Martin DB5 from "GoldenEye" (1995). Photo by London Film Museum

What do you think makes the Aston Martin such an iconic car?
I think it's quintessentially a very British car, as Bond is. It's a classy car, elegant, and it just lends itself to fast driving. And also, the gadgets that we put in it. You don't expect to see the gadgets coming out of such a classy car. I think [the contrast] that all helps.

Part of your job seems to be giving the cars personality beyond what they already have from the factory.
Yeah, character. Absolutely. That's what we strive to do. We have to really dig deep in your brain these days to try and come up with something that hasn't been seen before. I mean, when you look at how many of the cars have got missiles on! We have to strive and come up with something different.

Thanks to Chris Corbould and London Film Museum.